Free State Youth Care Centres (FSYCC) is responsible for the full-time care of 724 children in 33 youth care centres in different towns in the Free State. The children were placed there by the Children’s Court.

 

This include the following services:

  • Assessment of children with a view to placement;
  • Offering programs that help the child with physical, emotional, social, religious and educational development;
  • Care Leavers Program 

How to be involved as a volunteer

  • Become a holiday parent;
  • Help with children’s homework;
  • Provide a professional service eg occupational therapy;
  • Take child/ren on excursions;
  • Become a board member;
  • Present projects eg. teach children to paint

What do we need – Donations 

  • Food
  • Clothes especially shoes and underwear
  • Stationery
  • Detergents
  • Help with payment municipal account
  • Help with professional fees from psychologists

Get involved today. Send an email to info@engo.co.za or
contact 060 548 5543

Provincial office contact details

 Postal address: 12552, Brandhof, Bloemfontein, 9324
Street address : 22 Van Heerden Road, Wilgehof, Bloemfontein
Tel: 051 407 7207
Email: christa@vironskinders.org.za

Director Residential Child Care:
Mrs C Maree
NPO registration number: 043-195 NPO
Registration Department of Social Development: W4/1/3/3/1/1/8

 

For more information about a specific house, please follow the links below

Engo Centre Information

Bolokanang Child and Youth Centre

History

The Provincial planning for the decentralization and transformation of orphanages provides for the establishment of 13 decentralized centres in the Motheo region. Consequently, various possibilities for the establishment of centres were considered. The need for centres for children who are Sotho-speaking is especially great. When the property in Bloemvallei became, it is seen as a good possibility. The Ecclesiastical Social Services Office is urgently looking for a place to accommodate and care for a large number of Sotho-speaking children.

About 80 years ago, a farmer donated a piece of land, a part of the farm Diepfontein, to the Dutch Reformed Church with the aim of building a church for Sotho-speaking people. In time, the Department of Education requested that the church establish a school as well. The Dutch Reformed Church Bloemvallei initially built only one classroom. It was later expanded to a school with 8 classes. Toilets were erected with funds obtained from abroad, especially the Netherlands. However, over time, the school has shrunk to just two classes. A small hall was built to serve as a church.

The community consists of smallholdings and there are no negative social patterns present. The first meeting was held on February 8, 2007 with the community. It was decided to continue with the project. The church and the wider community undertook to support the project. The property was purchased by NG Welfare, the holding company of Bloemvallei NG Church and converted into a functional centre for 30 children.

A competition was held to decide on a name for the centre. Mr. Fritz Kröhn, a local lawyer, donates the prize money of R100.00 for the most suitable name. Finally, the name Bolokanang was decided upon. It was submitted by four children and means “to look after each other”. The first children were admitted during April 2008.

Location

Bolokanang Child and Youth Care Centre is located twenty-five kilometers outside Bloemfontein on the banks of the Modder River near Maselspoort and Phillip Sanders holiday resorts. It is surrounded by game farms, olive and karee trees, native vegetation and lots of fresh air.

Children

Bolokanang Child and Youth Care Centre cares for 30 Sotho-speaking children, boys and girls. There is a limited amount of secondary schools in the area and therefore there are more primary school children in the centre. On site is Uitkomst School. The children walk about twenty steps and then they are at school. The other children have to be driven to their respective schools.

 

Carpe Diem Child and Youth Centre

History

The initiative for the establishment of this Child and Youth Care Centre was taken by the pastors of Universitas-West Dutch Reformed Church, Reverend Petrus Kühne and Reverent Stefan Stassen met mrs Magda van Niekerk for the first exploratory conversation on 22 May 2003. During the same month, the sale of a portion of the property of Our Child and Youth Centre necessitated the acquisition of temporary housing for 12 children. A property of mr Das van Deventer at 52 De Bruin Street, Universitas-West was rented for this purpose.

On 9 October 2003, an action committee was elected to establish a youth care centre. The chairman was Reverent Petrus Kühne.  Mrs Wilma Henning also played a critical role. The listed property was purchased by NG Welfare. It was decided on the name “Carpe Diem” which means “Seize the day”.

Location

Carpe Diem is located at 52 De Bruynstreet in Universitas, Bloemfontein.

Children

The youth care centre is registered to care for 12 boys of all ages. The children are representative of the white, colored and black population groups. During 2014, a need arose for a home where only boys are housed. The centre was then turned into a boys’ home.

 

Charlotte Theron Child and Youth Centre

History

During the Anglo-Boer War Charlotte Theron, wife of the first N.G. Church pastor of Bethlehem began to care for orphans in the rectory. When there were too many children they had to clear a corrugated iron building next to the rectory for the 43 children they had to take care of. She said one day “Someone brought me a goat and someone gave me a bag of brought flour, now I’m going to start the orphanage. ” This is how the orphanage originated in 1903.

The centre consists of 9 residential units:

  • Lentehof
  • Pikkewyn
  • Eikehof
  • Esterhof
  • Nonnashof
  • Jania
  • Dennekruin
  • Jakaranda
  • Karee

Location

Charlotte Theron Child and Youth Care Centre is located at 46 Wessel Street in Bethlehem.

Children

There are separate residential units for boys and girls, as well as two Sotho dwelling units. Each residential unit has its own child care worker and functions on its own – like a large household. The centre currently cares for 123 needy children from all cultures. Ages of children range from 0 to 18 years (or until a child has completed his schooling).

Charlotte Theron Child and Youth Care Centre still stands firm with our motto: “The Lord will provide.”

 

David's Place Child and Youth Centre

History

The centre was established with the initiative of pastor Craige Harvey from the New Covenant Church.  He was a leader in the community of Ficksburg and Meqheleng.  During this time orphans were looked after informally and without subsidy from the Government.  The first meeting with the community was held on the 2nd of February 2005.  A Management committee was formed and pastor Harvey was elected as the Chairperson and mr Eddie Nthinya as Vice Chairperson.

Location

David’s Place Youth Care Centre is located at 9 De Villiers Street and was purchased by NG Welfare through dr Jack Amour and his wife for R90 000.00.

Children

The centre is registered for 12 children in need of care. Boys as well as girls are cared for in the centre. Everyone is Sotho-speaking.

 

 

Eikelaan Child and Youth Care Centre

History

The dynamic community of Bothaville forms an inter-church , multicultural action committee. Bothaville Council of Mercy, together with local role players, addressed the need for 2 youth care centres in Bothaville (Afrikaans) and Naledi (Sotho) respectively and thus confirmed the establishment of Eikelaan Child and Youth Care Centre and Nala re Thabile Child and Youth Care Centre. The first community committee meeting was held on May 30, 2002 under the chairmanship of Reverend Johan Lessing, ds Simon Dlamini and Ds. Jan Els with the help of the social worker of the Orange Women’s Association, mrs Lettie Ferreira.

Location

A house is being bought by NG Welfare at 18 Eikelaan in Bothaville. The house is being enlarged and changed to meet the needs of a Child and Youth Care centre. The house is located on the edge of town in a quiet residential area, Meyerhof. The centre opened its doors in January 2003.

Children

The youth care centre is registered to accommodate 12 children, Afrikaans-speaking, boys and girls, between the ages of 0 and 18 years.

 

 

 

Esperanza Child and Youth Care Centre

History

The Executive Committee of the church council of Waterbron Dutch Reformed church church, under the leadership of dr Brand Doubell, met with the Director of Child and Youth Care on December 4, 2002. The congregation decided to take ownership of a youth care centre. A holding that could be used for this purpose at Scriven Road, Hartbees was purchased by the NG Church Welfare. President Steyn School is within walking distance of the centre. During 2005, the adjoining municipality of Bainsvlei was also involved in the project.

Location

The centre is located on the plots at 12 Scriven Avenue, Bainsvlei in Bloemfontein and feels like a real farm. The children are free to play in the spacious yard.

Children

Esperanza cares for 12 children, boys and girls, mainly Afrikaans speaking. The children are representative of white, brown and black population groups. There is also an occasional baby in the centre.

 

 

Gardenia Child and Youth Care Centre

History

Gardenia Child and Youth Care Centre was established as a result of the initiative, motivation and perseverance of one person, namely Mrs. Ansa Coetzee. She liaised for the first time with the staff of Executive Management on 30 June 2003. The first meeting of an Action Committee was held on 13 October 2003. At the event, Mr. Henk van Zyl was as elected chairman.

The Dutch Reformed congregations of Gardenia, Hertzogville and Soutpan accepted ownership of the centre. A property was purchased at 68 Nerina Street, Gardenia Park by NG Welfare. It was broken down and enlarged to meet the needs of a youth care centre. The centre was later known in colloquial language as “House Nerina”.

Location

Gardenia Child and Youth Care Centre is centrally located at 68 Nerina Street, Gardenia Park in Bloemfontein. The motto of the centre is: God with us.

Children

The house cares for 12 children, boys and girls of all ages and races. The children are currently representative of the white and coloured population groups. They attend various schools in the community, ranging from mainstream education to special education.

 

 

Gedenk Child and Youth Care Centre

History

After the Anglo Boer War, Reverend Marquard became aware of the plight of the large number of orphans on the farms in the Ladybrand area. An orphanage was established in Ladybrand in memory of all the women and children who died during the war, hence the name “Gedenk”. The founding date of the orphanage was 1904. The children were cared for in large groups (25 children) of about the same age and gender by a matron. A total of 155 children were cared for in the orphanage.

The second phase in the development of facilities for children during the sixties was the establishment of orphanages. In time, the inhabitants of the orphanages were no longer orphans, but children who needed care because their parents could not provide for that need. Most of the children in Gedenk youth care centre did not come from Ladybrand. Many of the children came from the Rand. Less than 10 children came from the immediate area.

The Management of Gedenk youth care centre met on 12 June 2001. During the event, it was decided to discontinue the service in its current format as soon as possible. The residents and child care workers were being transferred to decentralized youth care centres as the process progressed. During 2002 the centre was reduced to three residential units and from 2003 to one residential unit in which 12 – 16 children can be cared for. The existing orphanage was sold and the funds were poured into a fund for the continuation of the service and the process of decentralization. The services of one of the child care workers, Mrs. Annatjie Stahmer, was retained for the decentralized centre. One of the residential units of the “old” orphanage was being upgraded as a decentralized youth care centre. It was decided to keep the name Gedenk / “Memorial”. A new management is composed of local people. There is one board member, Mr. Rassie van der Westhuizen, who is the chairman of the finance committee and who continuously makes his time, funds and expertise available to the centre.

The “new” decentralized centre was registered as an orphanage on 31 March 2003 in terms of section 30 of the Child Care Act.

Location

Gedenk Youth Care Centre is located at 1 Collin Street in Ladybrand.

Children

The Youth Care Centre is registered to take care of 12 children. Currently, 6 girls and 5 boys are cared for in the Youth Care Centre. Children are from Brown and Se-sotho population group. They attend different schools in the community. It ranges from regular stream education to special needs education.

 

 

Gladstoneweg Child and Youth Care Centre

History

This Child and Youth Care Centre is a project of the Berg en Dal group of churches. It consists of four Dutch Reformed congregations; Berg en Dal, De Bloem, Bloemfontein-Northand and Hugenote. The chairman of the Child Care Committee’s husband is an architect and played a leading role in the plans and finalisation of the Youth Care Centre’s buildings. The Youth Care Centre was occupied in December 2004.

Location

Gladstone Child and Youth Care Centre is located in the North of Bloemfontein at 65 Gladstone Road in Bayswater.

Children

The youth care centre is registered to take care of12 children, 6 boys and 6 girls. The children are representative of the white, coloured and black population groups.

 

 

House Amor

History 

House Amor evolved from the original house for unmarried mothers called Susanna Coetzee House. The original house was set up to house and care for women who, after the Anglo-Boer War, had nowhere to stay and for women who had been released from prison. In 1909 a rescue centre was established at 13 Reitz Street, Bloemfontein, which was maintained by Christians from the community. In 1966 the services were taken over by the Synodal Commission of the Dutch Reformed Church where unmarried mothers were cared for. In 1970, a larger building was established at 20 Van Heerden Street, Bloemfontein, with the aim of accommodating 24 unmarried mothers. From 1970 to 2002, 1,300 mothers were assisted in the Susanna Coetzee House, but with the change in abortion legislation, the need for this service diminished. In 2003, the management realized that the need for the home was not big enough to help only unmarried mothers and the Dutch Reformed Church, Langenhovenpark, was approached to take over the responsibility of the centre. The centre would then house needy girls as well as girls experiencing a crisis with a pregnancy. The house was moved to 12A Faurelaan in Wilgehof and the name later changed to House Amor.

Location 

House Amor is located at 12A Faure Avenue Wilgehof, Bloemfontein.

Children

Amor Youth Care Centre is registered to accommodate 10 girls and 2 pregnant girls from different cultural groups. Usually, a pregnant girl who experiences a crisis with a pregnancy is admitted to the centre two months before her due date. She will receive the necessary care and support at the centre and special guidance so that she is able to make an informed decision about the future of the baby.

House of Compassion Child and Youth Care Centre

History

During 2006, the Social Worker of KMD responsible for the Bainsvlei area became aware of the large number of children in the community who were affected by HIV / AIDS. The Dutch Reformed Church in Waterbron and Universitas  decided to provide a service together with other role players for the orphans, victims of domestic violence and rape.

Two years later, the program was adjusted for home care, a vegetable garden project, a soup kitchen and the care of 34 children. The building was rented from the Municipal Clinic at Bainsvlei. The building was restored and enlarged and converted into an orphanage. The Dutch Reformed Church provided funds for the purpose. Two congregations of the group of churces also provided the necessary furniture and equipment.

The management of Social Services of the Dutch Reformed Churches in Bloemfontein decided at a meeting held on 25 May 2009 that the facility should be developed into a Child and Youth Care Centre. The children in the centre was reduced to 24. The infrastructure of the centre deteriorated and an alternative option were  sought. In 2019, Deo Juvante Youth Care Centre closed after it was no longer sustainable. The Deo Juvante building was restored and altered to accommodate the 24 Children from House of Compassion. In May 2020, the centremoved to the new premises. The children now have more space and are very proud of their new home.

Location

The centre is located at 4 Faure Avenue, Willows in Bloemfontein.

Children

The youth care centre is registered to take care of 24 children, 12 girls and 12 boys. The centre provides the basic needs for these children. The children are representative of the brown and black population group. They attend different schools in the community.

 

 

Lefika Child Youth Care Centre

History

During August 2002, the Department of Social Development contacted the Executive of Free State Youth Care Centers in connection with the possible establishment of a decentralized centre in the Qwa-Qwa area.

On the 1st of August 2003, Dr Gideon van der Walt and Reverend Dries van der Merwe of the United Reformed Church, contacted the youth care centre on behalf of the congregation in Witsieshoek to request assistance with the establishment of a youth care centre. The congregation had an old rectory, which seemed to be a suitable building.

An information meeting with the community was held on the 21st of August 2003. Lefika Youth Care Centre was registered as a children’s home on the 2nd of September 2003 in terms of Section 30 of the Child Care Act. Reverend Dries van der Merwe was elected as chairman and Mr. Kokoi as vice-chairman. The center is located against a mountain in the Mabolela area near Witsieshoek. The name Lefika means “mountain”.

Moving to Kestell

On the 19th of May 2014, when the Youth Care Centre moved from Qwa Qwa to Kestell a new governing body was appointed consisting of members from the Kestell community.

A house was purchased in Kestell and necessary construction work was done to meet the requirements of the Youth Care Centre. Reasons for relocation: Reverend Dries van der Merwe, the chairman, moved to the Cape and at that time the financial circumstances of Lefika were worrying. The other active governing bodies that helped were mostly from Kestell. At the same time, the transport costs of the children daily to Retief High School in Kestell were also a reason for consideration. Lefika Child and Youth Care Centre’s move to Kestell had many positive consequences, including Retief High School’s great involvement and support in the management of the centre.

Location

Lefika Child and Youth Care Centre is located at 28 Cilliers Street in Kestell.

Children

The centre provides for 12 children in need of care. The residents consist of boys and girls who are all Sotho-speaking and their ages vary between 3 and 17 years.

 

 

Letsemeng Youth Care Centre

History

A survey during 2002 showed that there were 52 children from the Xhariep region in orphanages in Bloemfontein, Winburg and Bethlehem. It was decided to investigate the possibility of establishing a centre in Koffiefontein because the town had schools and the necessary infrastructure. In March 2002, three meetings with the community and various meetings with other role players such as De Beers Central Mines, the Dutch Reformed Church, Letsemeng Municipality and the local schools were held. On 9 September 2002, NG Welfare received notice that De Beers’ Koffiefontein diamond mine will donate a house on a holding called “The Park” to be developed as a youth care centre. The property was previously occupied by the Mine Manager.

Location

The centre is located on the edge of town on a very large plot next to the river, hence the name “The Park”. The address is “The Park”, Edward Road in Koffiefontein.

Children

The youth care centre is registered to take care of 24 children. The children are representative of the brown and black population groups. They attend different schools in the community. All the children are of school going age and most are young teenagers.

 

 

Maanblom Lefika Child Youth Care Centre

History

The establishment of Maanblom Child and Youth Care Centre was discussed at a meeting on the 27th of August 2002. There were 26 children from this area in the orphanage in Winburg. This was the great motivation for the decentralization. Persons involved with the children, had to drive to Winburg to visit them as well as the community to give donations. Together, Hennenman and Virginia’s communities decided on the establishment and management of the centre. They decided on Virginia because of the special education school in the town. The first board meeting took place on the 17th of September 2002. At the event, mr Oscar van Wyk was elected as chairman. The furniture for Maanblom came from Winburg orphanage. The women on the management committee worked very hard to furnish and equip the centre so that it could be converted into a homely environment for the children. They will always be remembered with great gratitude.

Location

Maanblom Child and Youth Care Centre is located at 10 Maanblom Street in Virginia, the name of the centre is also an indication of the address.

Children

The centre is registered to take care of 12 children who have been placed there by the Children’s Court for various reasons, there are also orphans in the centre. It was decided that the centre would become a boys’ home instead of both sexes. The language spoken in the centre is English and Afrikaans. The composition of the children in Maanblom varies because we cater for the needs of the Virginia, Hennenman, Welkom and Bronville communities. Children are placed again with parents, foster parents and family as soon as we are sure that it is in their best interest. We rarely have vacancies at the centre because the need is so great.

 

 

Marquard Child and Youth Care Centre

History

The first six residents moved into the new Marquard Child and Youth Care Centre on Friday, 15 August 2008. This centre is the 32nd decentralised centre (children’s home) of Free State Youth Care Centes. The centre cares for needy children from the communities of Marquard and Moemaneng. The building was donated by Christen Bedieninge, and was renovated with funds from Christen Bedieninge, NG Welsyn and the community. Donations of furniture and equipment came from several churches, community groups, the Volksblad Kersfonds and individuals.

Location

Marquard Youth Care Centre is located at 9 Jakob Makoelle Street in Marquard.

Children

The centre is registered to care of 16 Sotho children, boys and girls, from toddler to teenager. The centre provides in the physical and educational needs of the children as well as in their therapeutical and medical care.

 

 

Merafong Lefika Child Youth Care Centre

History

The growing need for a safe place to live for children in need ensured the establishment of Merafong Child and Youth Care Centre. The Witness Commission of the Dutch Reformed Church built the house in Hyslop Street, Welkom. This was the former rectory of dr Lourens Erasmus, made available for Merafong Child and Youth Care Centre. The congregation of Merafong West Park accepted responsibility for the project on the 16th of March 2008 with the support of members of the church. The adjoining Dutch Reformed Church, Welkom-West promises support. The first meeting with the community was held on the 17th of November. Merafong can accommodate 12 Sotho speaking boys. The first 6 boys moved in in April 2009.

The centre’s emblem is a mine shaft. Welkom is known for its gold mines. The name “Merafong” means “Place of Gold”. Every child is as precious as gold and that is what the children are taught – they are important and valuable. The centre is spacious and neat with a well-kept garden.

Location

Merafong Child and Youth Care Centre is located at 3 Hyslop Street, Seagull Park in Welkom. The motto of the centre is: Romans 8:31 “God is for us, who can be against us?”

Children

Merafong is registered to house 12 Sesotho boys aged betwen 0 to 18 years.

The children attend the service of the Dutch Reformed Church Reitzpark every Sunday. They also go to Sunday school classes and the Youth Club of the church. They are taught good Christian values ​​that help them make wise decisions. Reverend Pheko (the chairman, as well as retired pastor) also visits the centre once a week.

 

 

Nala Re Thabile Child Youth Care Centre

History

The dynamic community of Bothaville formed a multi-cultural action committee with members from different churches.  Local role players addressed the need for 2 Youth Care Centres respectively in Bothaville (Afrikaans) and in Naledi (Sotho).  That is how Eikelaan and Nala re Thabile Child and Youth Care Centres was established. The first community committee meeting was held on 30 May 2002, with Reverend Johan Lessing, Reverend Simon Dlamini and Reverend Jan Els with help from the social worker from Oranje Women Society, mrs Lettie Ferreira.

On the 10th of February 2005, Dutch Reformed Welfare started with the purchase of the premises at New Holland. The office buildings on the site were converted into a youth care center at little cost. There is also a borehole on the site. The property was subdivided and rezoned into a spacious, but manageable site. The office complex was transformed into a proud youth care center. An amount of R651 601 was spent. Reverend Hennie Hattingh was elected as the first chairman and Reverend Simon Dlamini as Vice-Chairman during the first meeting held with the community on the 24th  of November 2005. The center officially opened in June 2006. The name Nala re Thabile means – “that we are happy”.

Location

Nala re Thabile Youth Care Center is located at 12, 7th Avenue, Industrial Area, Bothaville.

Children

The center cares for children from (already had 2 babies / toddlers) pre-primary school to high school. Some of the residents have chronic illnesses, but can function normally with the necessary chronic medication, balanced lifestyle and regular medical examinations. Most children have extended families with whom they can go on holidays.

The youth care center was initially registered to care for 16 children (8 boys and 8 girls), between the ages of 0 – 18 years. On 1 April 2009, this number was increased to 24 children. With the support of the community, the registered number was adjusted again in September 2019 and 30 children between the ages of 0-18 years (15 boys and 15 girls) are currently being cared for. A large number of the children come from Bothaville, and the rest come from nearby towns in the Free State.

 

 

Our Child and Youth Care Centre

History

During a Dutch Reformed church meeting in April 1914, Reverend Kestell proposed that a home for neglected children must be established. A house was rented in Victoria Road, Bloemfontein, and six children were housed. Our Child and Youth Care Centre better known as Ons Kinderhuis was officially opened on the 11th of September of the same year.

Location

Our Child and Youth Care Centre is located at 46 Victoria Road in Bloemfontein.

The centre consists of 8 residential units:

  • Vastrap
  • Welverdiend
  • Dagbreek
  • Lentedou
  • Blydskap
  • Doephuis
  • Môredou
  • Vredehoek

Children

Our Child and Youth Care Centre currently cares for 122 children from all cultures. Ages range from 0 to 18 years (or until a child completes his schooling).

There are 4 residential units for boys and 4 for girls. The residential units are divided according to age groups. Each residential unit has its own child care worker and functions on its own – like a large household. There are 16 children from Our Child and Youth Care Centre in Amari school in Welkom, who live at the school’s residence.

OUR VISION

We want to give our children hope for their future.

OUR MISSION

Protection, care, education, development and treatment programs from a Christian perspective, for as many children in the Free State as possible, who need safety, protection or safe supervision on a cost-effective and financially sound basis.

 

 

Presidentia Child and Youth Care Centre

History

The Group of Churches in Kroonstad met on the 20th of July 2004 with the aim of investigating the establishment of a youth care centre in town. During the meeting, the members took note that:

  1. more than 50 children from Kroonstad were in the orphanages in Bethlehem and Bloemfontein; and
  2. a process of decentralization and transformation of the orphanages into smaller child and youth care centres had already begun.

The Dutch Reformed Churches decided to accept ownership of a youth care centre in Kroonstad. A suitable property at 89 Marais Street, Presidentia, Kroonstad was owned by NG Welfare purchased from mr Spahmer. The property was enlarged and altered in order to meet the needs of the cente.

The first chairman of the board was Reverend Barry Fourie and the vice-chairman was mr Christo Barnard. mr Wynand Smit played a key role throughout as chairman of the Finance Committee and mrs Tillie Fourie as chair of the Child Care Committee.

An application was made on the 17th of August 2005 to register Presidentia Youth Care Centre as a Children’s Home in terms of Art. 30 of the Child Care Act.

Location

Presidentia Youth Care Centre is located at 89 Marais Street in Kroonstad.

Children

The centre is registered to accommodate 12 children, 6 boys and 6 girls. Children are placed in the care of the centre by the Children’s Court. Children come from different cultural backgrounds and their ages range from 1 year old to 18 years old.

 

 

Ringer Street Child and Youth Care Centre

History

Ringer Street Child and Youth Care Centre is a community project in which all the role players in the community are involved. Mrs. Cecile Krause, who became aware of the need of the local children at a nutrition project of the Dutch Reformed Church and took the initiative for the establishment of a youth care centre. Mrs. Magda van Niekerk, the former Director of the Youth Care Centres, held the first meeting with the community on the 20th of January 2004. Christo Krause was elected as the first chairman. The house on the corner of Ringer and Kerk Streets was bought by NG Welfare. Construction and demolition took place to make the house suitable as a youth care centre. The centre opened on the 10th of January 2005.

Location

Ringer Street Child and Youth Care Centre’s address is 40 Ringer Street in Heilbron.

Children

The centre currently houses 12 Sotho-speaking children from the community and surrounding towns. The ages of the children range from baby to 18 years.

 

 

Sasolburg Child and Youth Care Centre

History

The community of Sasolburg has for many years contributed for many years to Gedenk Child and Youth Care Centre in Ladybrand. During 2001, it was decided to decentralize Gedenk Children’s Home. There were then about 30 children from Sasolburg in Gedenk Child and Youth Care Centre.

On the 13th August 2001, the first two community meetings were held in the Community Hall in Sasolburg. A large number of people attended the meeting, including Martie and Hennie Wagener who were involved with Gedenk Child and Youth Care Centre.

Mr. Don Esplin was elected chairman, Reverend Hans van Deventer as vice-chairman. It was decided to establish two residential units to provide care to 24. Two houses at 22 Vlaardingen Street and 31 Hans van Rensburg Street were purchased, enlarged and adapted to meet the needs of 12 children each. The furniture was obtained from Gedenk Child and Youth Care Centre. The first social worker was Mrs. Wilna Hansen and the first two child care workers were mrs Fienie Pienaar and Annette van der Walt. The first 24 children admitted were all originally from Sasolburg and the surrounding area. The centres have been in operation since 14 January 2002. The management decided to Appoint Ansie Venter as liaison officer. Sasolburg Child and Youth Care Centres were among the first decentralized homes to open in the Free State in 2002.

Location

The Boys ‘House is located at 22 Vlaardingen Street in Sasolburg and the Girls’ House at 31 Hans van Rensburg Street in Sasolburg.

Children

Sasolburg Child and Youth Care Centre consists of two residential units and cares for 12 boys and 12 girls respectively. The children’s ages range from babies to 18 years old. Children from different cultural backgrounds are cared for in the centres.

 

 

Senekal Child and Youth Care Centre

Geskiedenis

The Dutch Reformed Group of Churches in the Lindley area decided during 2001 to establish a decentralized youth care centre in the Presbytery. The group was previously involved with Gedenk Youth Care centre in Ladybrand. The process of decentralization and transformation then began.

It was decided on Senekal because it is the town in the area that has the best infrastructure and the most resources. The first meeting of the action committee was held on the 10th of October 2001. At the meeting, Reverend Otto Lessing of the Dutch Reformed Church Senekal North was elected as chairman and Moruti Michael Mackane of the Dutch Reformed Church of Africa as vice-chairman.

Different properties were looked at before it was decided to buy 34 De Villiers Street from a lawyer. Most of the furniture with which the centre was equipped was obtained from Gedenk Child and Youth Care Centre.

Location

Senekal Child and Youth Care Centre is located at 34 De Villiers Street in Senekal.

Children

The centre provides care to 12 children, of any age, gender, language and culture. Most children come from the local community and the centre makes an effort to involve the parents in their children’s care and development.

 

 

Thusano Child and Youth Care Centre

History 

Thusano means WE WORK TOGETHER and that is what happened in 1999. There were many children walking around in the streets, clearly neglected and not attending school. A committee was formed and what happened next is close to a miracle. The whole community stood together. About 50 children were given a meal at the centre and were helped to attend school. The municipality donated a building in Masilo, Theunissen. It was converted into a house where the children could stay and others came during the day to eat and study.

On the 5th of June 2002, Thusano was registered as a youth care centre of the Free State Youth Care Centre’s decentralization project and was registered to accommodate 15 children.

Location

Thusano Child and Youth Care Centre is located at 1171 Mosilo in Theunissen.

Children

The youth care centre is registered to care of 15 children. The children are representative of the Sotho population group. The children attend the surrounding schools and church services at Grace Miracle Church.

 

 

Tshepang Child and Youth Care Centre

History

There was a hospice in the area for people with HIV / AIDS. Sometimes the dying people brought their children with them. The children were then orphaned at the hospice. The need arose for a separate place that could accommodate and care for the children. Two doctors bought a house in the area and made it available as a place of safety for the orphans. During 2010, Engo became involved in the home and began the process of registering Tshepang as a youth care centre.

Location

The centreis located on the Ferreira plots just outside Bloemfontein next to the railway line. The address is Plot 5, Rev. Kotze Street, Ferreira in Bloemfontein.

Children

The youth care centre is registered to take care of12 children. The centre provides for the basic needs of these children. The children are representative of the black population groups and are virtually all orphaned. Most children are teenagers, but there is usually one baby in the centre as well.

 

 

Viljoenskroon Child and Youth Care Centre

History

A community meeting was held on the 20th of September 2001 in Viljoenskroon in order to reflect on the possible establishment of a child and youth care centre in the town. Mrs Lizanne Wilken, the social worker of Social Services of the Dutch Reformed Church and formerly of Winburg Youth Care Centre, made the arrangements for the meeting.

On the 23rd of October 2001, the first Management Meeting was held and the centre was established as a result of the process of decentralization. The house of Mrs. Crous, a widow at 49 Retief Street, was bought by NG Welfare. The house was spacious and a few changes were initially made. The centre was equipped with furniture from Gedenk Child and Youth Care Centre on Ladybrand.

In 2006 NG Welfare allocated money to make improvements to the house and a girls’ wing, lounge and an office for the social worker were added.

Location 

Viljoenskroon Child and Youth Care Centre is located at 49 Piet Retief Street in Viljoenskroon.

Children

The centrecan accommodate 12 children – 6 boys and 6 girls. The children’s ages range from babies to teens.

 

 

Vrede Child and Youth Care Centre

History

Reverend Kotie Marais, pastor of Vrede-West Dutch Reformed Church and his wife were house parents at Gedenk Child and Youth Care Centre in Ladybrand. When the process of decentralization and transformation of the large orphanages began, he felt called, in the light of their experience, to take the lead in the process in Vrede.

The community was visited on the 8th of March 2002. The first Management Meeting was held on the 9th of April 2002. At the meeting, Reverend Kotie Marais was elected Chairman and mr Piet Steyn as Vice-chairman. The Youth Care Centre opened during June 2002.

Location

Vrede Youth Care Centre is located at 100 Kühn Street in Vrede.

Children

Vrede Youth Care Centre is registered to take care of 12 boys and girls, Afrikaans-speaking, between the ages of 0 and 18 years.

 

 

 

Welkom Child and Youth Care Centre

History

A building was donated to NG Welfare by the Gold Fields Mining Group in 2001 for the establishment of a child and youth care centre at 13 and 15 Othello Street. It is located on the border of Bedelia and St Helena neighbourhoods in Welkom. The management and staff of Winburg Child and Youth Care Centre were initially very closely involved in the project. A needs assessment revealed that at that time 57 children from the Goudveld were cared for in the orphanage at Winburg. Two youth care centres opened in the Riebeeckstad neighbourhood and some of these management members, especially lawyer Oberholzer, provided assistance with the establishment of a management and committees at Welkom Youth Care Centre. The group of churches in the Welkom area also undertook to provide support. During a meeting held on the 6th of May 2003, the group of churches decided as follows: group of churches decided to become part of the child and youth care centre project as part of a community project. The following Dutch Reformed Church members will serve as members of the management: Mrs. M. Delport, G. Haylett, B. Mostert and a representative of the Dutch Reformed Church St. Helena who will be appointed by the church council of the relevant congregation. Reverend Scholtz was then appointed by the congregation. The official opening of the centre took place on the 1st of May 2004.

The original building was demolished and upgraded. Funds were specifically spent on the construction of a large living room for the children and a pleasant apartment for the house parents. These funds were obtained from Winburg Child and Youth Care Centre. The Winburg Child and Youth Care Centre provided the first furniture. The community also made large financial contributions. Clear Water Pools donated a swimming pool to the great delight of the children. Nedbank donated beds and various businesses, such as the casino, made contributions.

Location

Welkom Youth Care Centre is located at 13 & 15 Othello Road in St. Helena, Welkom.

Children

Welkom Youth Care Centre is registered for the care of twelve children. The centre always has two babies in Place of Safekeeping. These are babies who are made available for adoption and are cared for in the centre before the adoption takes place or possible other placement.

 

 

Welriedal Child and Youth Care Centre

History

During 2001, it was decided to decentralize Winburg Orphanage. There were then about 30 children from the Goldfields area in the orphanage. On the 11th of July 2002, an Action Committee met in Riebeeckstad. Freegold (Harmony Gold) donated 4 mining houses in Liszt Street. The houses were connected in pairs and converted into two beautiful units opposite each other, with funding from NG Welfare.

Location

Welriedal Child and Youth Care Centre is located in Riebeeckstad, near Welkom in the Free State Goldfields. Welriedal Child and Youth Care Centre has 2 houses viz. Welriedal 1 at Lisztstraat 1 and 3 and Welriedal 2 at Lisztstraat 2 and 4. The name originated as follows: Wel – represents Welkom, Rie – represents Riebeeckstad and Dal – represents Odendaalsrus.

Children

All the boys live in Welriedal 1. Across the across the street all the girls live in Welriedal 2. The children are all between 0 and 18 years old and come from different cultural groups. We act as a Place of Safety in an emergency and then there are more than 12 children in the house for a while.

 

 

Winburg Child and Youth Care Centre

History

Winburg Orphanage was established during 1903. Reverend J.J.T. Marquard, with the help of the Dutch Reformed Church and the community, decided to create a home for the orphans. The orphanage was located on the same site where the centre still is today, namely Gillespie Street, Winburg. The first head of the centre was Miss Murray. She started the orphanage with 11 children. Their mothers died in the concentration camps.

The orphanage’s name was changed to Winburg Orphanage during 1966 at the request of the residents. During 1971 the management decided that the buildings no longer met the needs of the children and construction began on a new complex for 164 children. As the building progressed, the demolition of the old building began systematically. The new building was occupied in March 1973. During 2000 the name was changed to Winburg Child and Youth Care Centre.

During 1902 to 1905 three large orphanages were established by the Dutch Reformed Church in the Free State, namely Our Children’s Home (220 children) in Bloemfontein, Charlotte Theron Children’s Home(280 children) in Bethlehem and Gedenk Children’s Home (155 children) in Ladybrand. The activities of the orphanages were coordinated and directed by the Synodal Commission for the Service of Mercy (SKDB) of the Dutch Reformed Church.

During 2000, this commission looked at different models for the care of law-abiding children in order to ensure that, despite many changes, action was still being taken in the best interests of the children. The service had to be efficient and affordable. It should alleviate the need of as many children as possible to an acceptable standard.

On the 29th of August 2001, the establishment of an overarching management structure was approved. Power of attorney was granted to the body to convert some of the existing assets of the orphanages into cash in order to finance a new model.

The first meeting of the Executive Committee for Free State Youth Care Centres was  held on the 21st of September 2001. The model decided upon was that a Therapeutic Centre be established on the site of Our Children’s Home. The centre was to provide care, education, development and treatment to 100 children with special needs. A further 600 children would be cared for in 50 decentralized centres, which are spread across the province. It was decided that about 12 children of both sexes and all ages will be cared for in a decentralized centre. Each centre will employ a child care worker, a general assistant and a part-time relief child care worker, as well as a part-time social worker.

Executive management begins the process of decentralization by decentralizing Gedenk Children’s Home in Ladybrand. Since 2002, there has only been one decentralized child and youth care centre in Ladybrand. The name Gedenk was retained. After this, Our Children’s Home is transformed into a Therapeutic centre. During 2005, the plan, which was largely on paper, also became a reality for Winburg.

The converted units, which have been upgraded and fenced off as separate facilities, have been occupied since September 2006. Winburg Child and Youth Care centre is now registered with the Department of Social Development as a child and youth care centre for the care of 30 children. The children themselves helped to move from the large facility to the smaller centre with only two units.

Management revised the constitution and management plan to keep pace with the process of decentralization and transformation.

The motto of the centre is: “The Lord will provide”. It has been the experience of the facility for over 100 years already. The coat of arms of the centre consists of a combined anchor and cross motif. The anchor refers to steadfastness and the cross serves as the Christian symbol.

Location

Winburg Child and Youth Care Centre is located at 13 & 15 Gillespie Street in Winburg.

The two residential units are known as House Diamond for the boys and House Emerald for the girls.

Children

There are 15 boys and 15 girls in the care of the Winburg Youth Care Centre. The children speak Sotho, English and Afrikaans. Both the child care workers are qualified and registered with the SACSSP as prescribed and required.

 

 


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